Vitamin B For the Flabby (Homeschooling) Soul

I don’t know if anyone else needs the encouragement to keep going with school-at-home now that the weather has decided to stop being foolish.  But I, for one, feel like I’m on the last lap at a track meet.  I always need to be reminded why I’ve chosen this life right about now.  So, without further ado, some quotable quotes from smart people about why freedom, flexibility, and focused time are some the best educational gifts we can give our kids–that, in the end, they help to foster real learning, not regurgitation.  (Plus, it’s almost pool weather).

“Knowledge which is acquired under compulsion has no hold on the mind. Therefore do not use compulsion, but let early education be a sort of amusement; you will then be better able to discover the child’s natural bent.”
Plato

“Self-education is the only possible education; the rest is mere veneer laid on the surface of a child’s nature.”
Charlotte M. Mason

“Thank goodness my education was neglected.”
Beatrix Potter

“It is a very grave mistake to think that the enjoyment of seeing and searching can be promoted by means of coercion and a sense of duty. To the contrary, I believe it would be possible to rob even a healthy beast of prey of its voraciousness, if it were possible, with the aid of a whip, to force the beast to devour continuously, even when not hungry.”
Albert Einstein

“The home is the chief school of human virtues.”
William Ellery Channing

“It is hard not to feel that there must be something very wrong with much of what we do in school, if we feel the need to worry so much about what many people call ‘motivation’. A child has no stronger desire than to make sense of the world, to move freely in it, to do the things that he sees bigger people doing.”
John Holt

“The aim of education should be to teach us rather how to think, than what to think – rather to improve our minds, so as to enable us to think for ourselves, than to load the memory with the thoughts of other men.”
James Beattie

“We want our children to become who they are— and a developed person is, above all, free. But freedom as we define it doesn’t mean doing what you want. Freedom means the ability to make choices that are good for you. It is the power to choose to become what you are capable of becoming, to develop your unique potential by making choices that turn possibility into reality. It is the ability to make choices that actualize you. As often as not, maybe more often than not, this kind of freedom means doing what you do not want, doing what is uncomfortable or tiring or boring or annoying.”
Gregory Millman, Homeschooling: A Family’s Journey

“The home is the first and most effective place to learn the lessons of life: truth, honor, virtue, self control, the value of education, honest work, and the purpose and privilege of life. Nothing can take the place of home in rearing and teaching children, and no other success can compensate for failure in the home.”
David O. McKay

Keep going, fellow Mom-Teachers!  Summer is coming.  What you’re doing is worth it!

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